Sep
30

Everything Mind Now Available!

Everything Mind Chris Grosso

Everything Mind is now available! You can purchase it on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or anywhere else books are sold!

“I dig this book. By sharing his life’s journey, Chris Grosso shines a light on our own. Everything Mind is a spiritual meal cooked for today, for us living now to taste, for our hearts and minds to digest.” 

-Jeff Bridges, Academy Award®-winning actor, musician, and New York Times bestselling coauthor of The Dude and the Zen Master

“I’m not a yogi from the Himalayas, a preacher from the pulpit, or a guru with dollar signs in my eyes,” says Chris Grosso. “The truth is, as a result of years of heavy drug and alcohol addiction, I’ve been to some extremely dark places that resulted in a literal life-or-death search for something more.” With Everything Mind, this emerging voice of the spiritual counterculture presents a riveting and insightful book about meditation, the search for deeper meaning, and the life-changing (and life-saving) process of waking up.

“Everything Mind” means it’s all part of the path—dark and light, sacred and profane, serious and goofy, tragic and joyous. Each experience is unique, each has something profound to teach us if we open ourselves and let it in. Sharing hard-won wisdom and the spiritual practices that helped him through his darkest times, Chris invites you to discover:

• Spirituality—how something that doesn’t fix your problems or change who you are can still revolutionize your life

• Why well-worn ideas like “love everyone” and “anything is possible” are much more than just wishful bullshit

• The perils of railing at fundamentalism—how to put down the pitchfork and practice compassionate spiritual discernment

• The mystery of “interbeing”—convincing your head, heart, and gut that you’re actually connected to everything

• Expressing your truth through service, meditation, sports, relationships, punk rock, skateboarding—or just about anything done with love

Finding our own spirituality is both liberating and terrifying. Liberating because we no longer have to be tied down by dogma or march off to war just because a guy in a fancy hat says so. Terrifying because it’s now totally on us to find out what’s true, what’s holy, what really matters to each of us. “Cultivating a spiritual lifestyle may be the most challenging undertaking you’ll ever face,” says Chris Grosso. “But if you stick with it, you can learn to meet all of life with an open heart—which, when you get down to it, is pretty fucking amazing.”

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Sep
26

The Facade of Happiness and Contentment

chris grosso

So, for the first time ever I cried in the middle of giving a public talk. It was the most vulnerable moment of my life. I arose this morning having literally not slept a minute last night, my heart breaking in ways I didn’t think possible, and all I wanted to do was crawl back under my covers and disappear. But I sat for a moment and felt a deep knowing that I needed to show up to the event today, and not only for others, but for myself as well. While there, I couldn’t fake a smile. I couldn’t lie and tell people things were going good. All I could do was show up and offer myself completely, which I did. That is what my heart has been telling me to do for the majority of my life, but it hasn’t been until the last several years that I’ve truly honored that calling. So in my pain and brokenness, I showed up. I let people see that we don’t always have to create some facade of happiness and contentment… that it’s okay to embrace our humanity, all of it. I didn’t do a goddamn thing that was special, so please don’t confuse what I’m saying. I just showed the fuck up regardless of how much I didn’t want to… and I honored the pain, vulnerably sharing it with others. I “honored my awkwardness” as my friend Lauren said. I stood there, microphone in hand, and I cried. I didn’t think I was going to be able to make it through the talk, but I closed my eyes and brought myself back to conscious breathing and somehow, I was able to finish forty-five minutes of doing my best to share a message of hope in the face of adversity. I want to thank every single person who gave me a hug afterwards. Thank you for letting me know you could relate, in one way or another, to my words and pain. Thank you for honoring the fact that life isn’t always pretty, and in these dark moments, we can truly be there for one another. As I write this I’m filled with heartbreak, love, gratitude and unbearable sadness, but I’m showing up for all of it, for myself… and for all beings. May we all find and experience whatever healing it is that we’re in need of.

 

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Sep
25

Jarvis Jay Masters – A Game of Dominoes

Jarvis Jay Masters Chris Grosso

“Man, I heard you talking about your father over the tier the other day.”

Streeter and I paced the length of the prison exercise yard.

“It brings up a lot, don’t it?” I said.

“There’s connections, bro. You get the visits, I don’t. But how many fathers do you see, black, white, brown—it’s the same, no difference—in the visiting room? But I bet you see none! None! Nada!”

Streeter was right. I had been looking around, seeing grandmothers, mothers, aunts, brothers and sisters, all ages of kids, but no fathers, none. I never thought about it before seeing my own father, then realizing this was part of a bigger story.

I thought, damn, this ain’t right. What did we do for all of it to get like this? That pain came up for me, something I had never seen in myself before. 

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Sep
17

Jarvis Jay Masters – Beyond My Memories

Hey Friends! Here’s a new piece Jarvis has written that he’s passionate about getting out into the world. It’s my honor to be here and do that for him on his behalf. May Jarvis’s words benefit all who read them. (For more information on Jarvis, please visit: www.freejarvis.org)

 

Beyond My Memories

by

Jarvis Jay Masters

 

What do I call this man—father, daddy, man, or just, what’s up?  After thirty years I picked up the phone to dial his number. I heard myself say, “Daddy, what’s up?”

“Ah, man, what’s going on?” he said.

“Man-ah- man,” I stuttered, something that I hadn’t done since I was a child. “Not-not-that much.”

I cried, beginning to let go of anger and confusion. But for all of the hurt he caused, I still wanted to hold on to feeling angry at this man. To what end? His life? Mine? Now I too am a grown man. But I was still time-traveling to those old places in my life when me and my siblings really needed a father.

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